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-hour -- the british prime minister since a shock wave through the eu, promising a referendum on britain's membership. >> time to cobble together a coalition after the israeli prime minister just scrapes through with an election victory. >> did germany's education minister plagiarize her phd? her university launches an investigation. talk about putting a cap amongst the pigeons a day after german and french leaders pledged to deepen e u's economic and monetary union. the british prime minister has signaled his country could want out. >> in a very -- delayed speech, david cameron said he wants to renegotiate the terms of britain's membership and the referendum, but not until the end of 2017. >> that has rattled london's biggest allies and some investors. more uncertainty and possible of people are not what they have been wishing for. >> kamen said he'd campaigned for es you vote, saying he had won the decisions he had -- the concessions he had campaigned on. >> the move had long been anticipated at home and across the european union. david cameron laid out his vision of britain's future. it is one tha
sending in peacekeepers, which france says it would back. eu foreign ministers have been talking about the conflict, agreeing that african troops should take over from the french asap. >> here's more on the story beginning with germany's involvement. >> german aircraft could soon be used to support french intervention in mali, providing mid-air refueling to french planes as they go to combat zones. the proposed increase in german military involvement has been welcomed by lawmakers from the governing coalition. >> it is about making more support available to our french partners. to help make sure that mali does not turn into a breeding ground for international terrorists. >> germany has already provided two military transport planes to help transport african union troops with a third ready if needed, but further help will require approval from parliament. the green party do not see it as a simple yes vote. >> the crucial thing about this military involvement is that it must lead to a political process because the military cannot solve the problem. >> parliament must also approve a plann
it was a miracle that he had survived. >> we will be back with more news including what the eu is calling it a milestone for europe. >> continuing our coverage rocketeers of friendship between france and germany, but turning away from politics. these pacts are not worth much without real ties. the cultural exchange was an important part of the treaty. >> there is a big french community in berlin. we found out what they think about the ties and the differences between the two countries. >> he came to berlin to do an internship. that was four years ago. the young journalists stayed on to document life in the german capital. his address book is a who's who of berlin. the contact come from his job editing a francophone listing guide, pocket berlin. he says it is great to be french in berlin. people are relaxed and approachable. quite simply, people are very direct. they find it easy to come up and chat. it's easy to talk to people, to make first contact with people here. >> he still spends a lot of time discussing life with his colleagues at the listing guide. most were attracted by the polis
>> today, public disillusionment with the eu is at an all-time high. referendum on europe's future. you're watching al jazeera. a third term for benjamin is in yahoo! with a narrow win forcing the coalition with new sets of rivals. north korea threatens to step up its nuclear program after the u.n. condemns decembers rocket launch. >> a panel on the country's top court could throw out the jail sentence of a french woman serving time for kidnapping. more coming up. >> britain's prime minister says he will let the public decide if they want to stay in the european union if he's reelected. david cameron ended months of speculation by promising a referendum on the question, it he is backing. 2015. however, he said that he prefers britain to stay in member of the you. -- in the -- state a member of the eu. >> i am not a british isolationist. but i want a better deal for britain. but not just for britain, but for europe, too. i speak as a british prime minister with a positive vision for the future of the european union. a future in which britain wants and should want to play a committed
for the british people to say whether they want to be in the eu or out. some were quick to criticize the move, saying it could block future risk. our correspondent reports. >> it had been a long time coming, but at last, david cameron delivered his speech on europe. he began with a repeat of what has gone wrong. the ever closer eu integration, a more flexible approach from what is required. >> if we do not address these challenges, the danger is that europe will fail, and the british people will drift toward the exit. i do not want that to happen. i want the european union to be a success, and i want the relationship between britain and the european union that keeps us in it. >> the prime minister said the main problem with the growing gap between the european union and those is the there was resentment about rules and regulations. >> countries are different. they make different choices. we cannot harmonize everything. >> the solution, he said, was to try to claw back some power from the eu, and then when that was done, put it to the people. >> when we negotiate that new settlements, we will
his criticism of eu integration at the world economic forum in davos. >> gender equality in the united states -- the pentagon lifts its ban on women in front line and combat roles. >> on the chopping block, germany's second-largest bank plans to fire up to 10% of its work force. the european union is at a crossroads, and the british prime minister, david cameron, says if the blockheads towards the centralized political union, then it is not for him and not for britain. >> german chancellor angela merkel has chosen her words very carefully, responding at the world economic forum in davos by voicing conditional optimism as far as europe's future goes. she says that patience is needed for structural reforms to take effect. >> she has also called for more regulation of the finance industry to avoid more turbulence, a point of contention with britain. both agree that competitiveness is the key, but how to go about that is the big question. >> david cameron brought his message with him to the swiss alps. in his address to the world leaders in doubles, he repeated his demands for big changes
risen to 26%. half of young people are out of work. but the eu has signaled it is willing to relax rules on spain, which could help soften the austerity measures apparently crippling the country. >> germany may be about to drop its objections to bailing out cyprus. despite misgivings about reports of money laundering by the island's thanks. >> a number of politicians in germany have accused separate banks of holding significant illegal deposits with russian money, something they deny. they had threatened to refuse to finalize a bailout unless the country clean up -- clint of its act, but berlin is reported to have relented after pressure from other eurozone countries. cyprus needs about 17.5 billion euros to keep afloat. >> onto wednesday's market action now, and european shares dropped later in the session, reaction to weak economic data out of the united states. our correspondents and as the summary from the frankfurt stock exchange. -- our correspondent sent us this summary from the frankfurt stock exchange. >> the people here are convinced that the euro sovereign debt crisis is slowl
of a couple in the last year to syria when the e.u.'s embargo changed, the provisions of that changed and so, i think those are advantages. >> thank you. >> mike gates. >> can you confirm in the case of an agreement between the u.k. and another government perhaps some kind of defense cooperation that doesn't have the same status as the, where we are talking about restrictions or controls on the arms exports that are purchased from british companies or exported from this country? in other words, if the mod decides to transfer equipment to another state that wouldn't be subjected to the same criteria as would apply with regards to the armed export regime? . . >> if you have further information; that would be helpful. okay. that's fine. can i ask you about the review as regards the workload that you referred to for ministers, the number of items for consideration: you said thorough overseeing of ministers went up 235 this year compared to 153 last year and 39 in the previous year before your middle east and north africa review. >> right. >> this is presumably dealt with by the human rights sect
because there are so many e.u. trips that i have been on with the bush administration and the obama administration where they blame the united states for bringing down the rest of the world when it comes to its state of the economy. it looks like now things are almost reversed in a way. tell us about your conversation with cameron. >> when i interviewed prime minister cameron here in new york and he was sort of in the lion's den because he had thrown down the gauntlet with this speech about britain's position in the european union. britain is not fully in in terms of it is not part of the eurozone. it doesn't have the euro but in many aspects it is in and it is a full member. united states depends on britain for the very strong role in international affairs. it helps all over the place whether in trying to confront iran, syria and north korea with sanctions and plays a big role whether afghanistan, iraq. david cameron is saying we like our foreign role. we like you and our economic role in the e.u. but we don't want to be a part of your political role. he is trying to negotiate a ha
account deficit at about $2.5 billion. the trade in goods deficit came to more than 9.5 billion dollar. eu and chinese consumers have been buying fewer japanese products. company directors saw exports fall by 4.2% over last year while imports rose by 0.8%. time to get a check on the markets. the yen remains weak on speculation that the prime minister will push for further monetary easing measures. the dollar hit the 89 yen level for the first time in two and a half years. that pair trading at 89.07 to 12 at the moment. the euro hit the 118 level for the first time in 20 months. that pair is changing hands at 118.10 to 15. market participants say worries about the debt situation in the euro zone has eased due to positive comments on the regional economy from the european central bank president. let's see how this is affecting the stock market. the weaker yen is prompting export on stocks. let's take a look at how other markets in the asia pacific are performing. south korea's kospi trading modestly in the negative down about .10 of a percent. look likes a bit of a mixed picture today. over
of the eu poverty categories. india has officially made a protest to pakistan after two soldiers were killed in kashmir. the army says pakistani troops calls -- crossed a line of control, entering indian territory and poppa stein denied the accusation as propaganda -- pakistan deny the accusations as propaganda. >> in southeastern australia, firefighters are battling nearly 200 bushfires as hundreds of people have been forced to leave their homes. one family who escaped the blaze that destroyed their home by hiding under a jetty, and they watched as several of their neighbors' houses burned down. the town in tasmania is one of the worst affected by the fires. andrew thomas has more. >> firefighters are racing to and through the latest blaze before it could get out of control. more than 150 wildfires raged in a study overnight and into wednesday morning. given the extent of the fires, in the worst conditions australia has had in many years, damage to buildings was remarkably light. this historic house in the southern state of victoria was the exception rather than the roll. although daylight
the put -- the position from cyprus. ireland received an eu bailout two years ago. since then, it has won praise from brussels for its austerity measures. it is helping keep the cost of presidency down, budgeting for around 60 million euros. that is half of what was spent when the country last held the role in the 2004 -- in 2004. >> also on monday, in germany gave up its seat on the un security council after wrapping up the 2 -- two-year term as a nonmember. allies weremany's disappointed when the country abstained on a vote to authorize a no-fly zone over libya. among germany's achievements was an initiative which really -- which led to climate change being recognized as a threat to international peace and security. >> as tuesday began, people and many parts of the world celebrated start -- people in many parts of the world celebrated the start of the new year. australia had a fireworks display in sydney's famous harbor. 10 hours later, germany welcomed the new year. the country's biggest street party was held at the brandenburg gate. revelers were treated to a concert featuring big-nam
can be taken out of his position. >> we are seeing a lot of military maneuvers by the u.s. and e.u. in terms of moving arsenals to the turkish border region of syria. >> maybe these are the anti- missile defenses. i am not aware of a large contingency of people moving their to suggest there is an idea of intervention. it does not seem like intervention is on the radar. >> we will leave it there. thank you for joining us. pakistan says indian troops have killed a soldier in the disputed region. two sides exchanged fire across the line of control that is an internationally recognized border. india is accusing them of violating the cease-fire. the u.s. drone strike killed 16 people in northern pakistan. it comes days after another drought attack killed a top rebel leader in the area. pakistani intelligence officers say. taliban hideouts were targeted on sunday. >> according to reports, u.s. drone strikes on at least three different targets in the tribal territory leaves at least 16 people killed on the ground after 10 missiles were fired by the drones operating over the territory. in
for military operations against the militants. the imf and the eu already pledged money to support the beleaguered economy. i jubilation and towns across northern mali. people here know how fragile of their security is. the militants may have vanished for now and the desert, but any sign of weakness and they could return. few relished the prospect of a long guerrilla war. >> let's get the latest live from timbuktu. tom went into timbuktu with the troops and he joins us live. the islamist rebels out of sight but not out of mind? >> exactly. they are believed to be hiding in surrounding desert. but i can tell you the tension is rising here in timbuktu. there are scenes of looting downtown, with dozens of people out in the streets going one shop after the other, targeting shops that were held by ethnic touraregs. accusing them of collaborating with ms -- islamists and they say they are hiding arms, cash, and weapons. the malian army deployed in town, and is trying to contain the crowd, although it is not clear because there also kind of smiling and waving at the crowd. they have pulle
as the eu politics are, they're on their way to unified banking regulation in the eurozone. their crisis fund has stabilized. it's not going to be pretty and it's going to take a couple of years still, but we are on our way to a stronger and more unified eu, with or without britain over time. >> what do you think? >> a little bit too positive to me. i would say europe is probably not coming apart. different said statement than europe is coming together. i think the reason it probably won't come apart is greece, not france. sooner or later, that is the real test. the president of france is taking france in directions that are truly unsustainable economically. but for germany, it's one thing if greece were to leave, but for france, it can't leave. if you're germany, that's the whole core, the whole concept, the dynamic of post-world war ii european integration. germany will go to great lengths, i think really whatever lengths it takes to keep france in. europe will survive but economic growth is not going to take off, it's still going to be extremely weak because it doesn't have in place a
the bailout. that was an incredible show of will. halting and clumsy and awkward as the eu politics are, they're on the way to banking regulation in the euro zone. it's not going to be pretty and it's going to take a couple years still, but we are on our way to a stronger and more unified eu with or without britain over time. >> what do you think? >> too positive to me. europe is probably not coming apart. different said statement than europe is coming together. the reason it probably won't come together is not greece, it's france. sooner or later, that is the real test. the president of france is taking france in directions that are truly unsustainable economically. france can't leave if you're germany because that's the whole core, the whole dynamic. the relationship. germany will go to great lengths, really, whatever lengths it takes to keep france in. europe will survive but economic growth is not going to take off, still extremely weak because it doesn't have in place any of the prerequisites. >> the head of morgan stanley had a piece where he said that europe is actually going to bounce
, it is now the e.u. state that is coming up to the first of march deadline of the current e.u. whether they will want to amend that in any way. it could be amended to apply to the regime and not to the opposition forces but it could be amended in many other ways. as a that would require the agreement of all of the states. >> in the syrian opposition i'm interested to know if that could be linked but not lethal. how serious is this embargo and is it possible for example the communications equipment that could be used in conjunction with turkey and some other countries to the elements in your possession. >> well, it's not military. it's certainly not legal. the systems so far include some things like the deployment on the stabilization defense to work with the opposition on the future plans and how they are getting help for people's basic needs and oppositions and training the citizens. we are providing each other actable material in the kits and generators to help civilians in opposition the communications equipment to help activists overcome the communications, blackouts, blockages pro
who engage in scare will tell you that our party will come to power, rip up our agreement with the e.u. and take our country out of the eurozone break all of greece's ties with the culture civilized west and turn greece to a new north korea. my dear friends, this is the worst form of scare. my party doesn't want any of these things. we were always and will continue to be a european party. the fact we believe that europe is lost the road, in that it is imposing inhuman policies on it's very people can be considered antieuropean. of our policies have to match the best interest of the people of europe if we were to be considering ourself proeuropean. and the fact that europe is our common home and we have to protect it from the great depression that is spreading and threatening not only use europeans but the entire world economy we want to stop the splintering of europe. that's why we're against today's austerity policies. that's why we are standing against today's european us a austerity policies. i want to say it plainly, when it comes in to power. in greece wealth have one -- we'll hav
to respond. they have not taken any decisions beyond that. it is now for a eu states coming up at the 12th of march deadline whether or not they want to amend that in any way. it could be an unmanned -- amended so it would apply to the regime and not to opposition forces. it could be amended in many other ways. it would require the agreement of all member states. >> i understand we are already supplying equipment to elements within the surreal -- syria opposition. i am interested to know, that could be military. how strict is this embargo? is it possible if we are giving communications equipment that could be used a in conjunction with weaponry supplied by turkey? or some other countries to elements within the opposition? >> it is not military. it is certainly not lethal. the assistance includes things like the deployment of our response team to work with their opposition on their future plans. how they are getting help to people with basic needs. we are training through citizen journalist. we are providing water purification hits and generators to help civilians. -- water purification kit
the e.u. to impose sanctions on hezbollah, and you have been a believer that we should not do it alone, we should do with unilateral. what we do take the chance and urged the european union to sanction has a lot? is we shouldn insurer swer not be writing lesser proof, i think the president is the appropriate official. >> and congress has no interest in whether the e.u. would be sanctioned as a terrorist or a station? >> the congress has a responsibility in a lot of things. >> that me ask you this about the iranian revolutionary guard. he said a minute ago you think they are a terrorist recession. do you agree? bailout yes. >> and you voted against the amendment designating them as a terrorist organization because they are recognized as a state? iran, you would not want to designate the army of a recognized as a terrorist? >> i just clarify a statement on iran being a recognized nation by the nine nations, by most world bodies. the reason why i did not vote as 22 other members that because i think jim webb's argument was a strong argument, and that is we have -- and this is what he said
to israel, but what they pose to america. when they call on the eu to designate hezbollah terrorist organization. they cite the damage that hezbollah has done to american military men and women and american security interests and for steve to just, you know, like sweep this away is, this is just israel and israel supporters wanting a bunch of love letters is really, i'd say, actually, offensive. if you look -- why is ben carden. senior democrat in a democratic conference. he came out today. so, this is a senior democrat knowing that the president of his party is about to nominate chuck hagel for secretary of defense and ben carden is raising serious questions. yet, another democrat to raise questions. what is giving them pause? i don't think it's as simple as steve just dismissed it. these love letters or disagreement over some love letters to israel. real national security issues at stake. senator hagel was opposed to sanctions against syria. one of a handful of sanctions -- >> i want to get steve to respond to you on that. i want to throw in this issue. what is a bigger issue for
and then the eu, arms embargo in 2004, a flood of weaponry came into libya. most of it was over a billion dollars, which in absolute terms may not be that great but relative to what was there before and what the purpose is, what it was used for, created, i was an unfair playing field. you couldn't say that we were, your, this was not a usual issue a source we were concerned. that process, and i argue, as i argue in the book, was very much tied to the whole issue of ask not, putting accountability in place for, you know, what we would get, what gadhafi would not do as a result of the agreements that were signed with him. a lot of people, i think that weaponry, again, small arms, surveillance equipment, all of the sort of things you'd need to put down a popular revolt was put in the hands of the regime, essentially due to complicity and lack of attention by parties in the west. so that's one, one thing. as far as what president, civil war, you know, civil wars are, you know, that's a key question, and i don't -- the preponderance come in, the rebels themselves managed to present a case that ask for
of universities, law schools, international lawyers, ngos. everybody who works for the e.u. and so, my question would be a little more specific. what is the social base for the sovereignty movement and particularly, what are the elites in america, for example, that can be mobilized in order to resist and assert his father in view? >> i suppose the social base in places such as face and think tanks and activist. was probably the first effort of the movement back in the 1950s, which was promoted, the main promoter in 1855 is the american bar association, which was leading defender and they were close to senator john bricker of ohio, who introduced this amendment that's really complicated, but basically treaties could not trumpet and any treaties not self-executing but we can't congress and pass a lot implementing executive orders. so i've given toxic groups around the country. because activists are counteracted this or interested in american sovereignty on a wide range of issues, people who are conservative on agenda 21 and environmental issues and think there's an overreach by global environment
a strong u.k. and a strong e.u. so i'm wondering what the white house makes of the announcement today that there will be a referendum on that issue and what the united states has at stake in the u.k. staying part of the e.u. >> we welcome the prime minister's call for britain to remain in the e.u. and to retain a leading role in europe's institutions and as the president told the prime minister when they spoke last week, the united states values a strong united kingdom and a strong european union. we value our central relationship with the u.k. as well as our relationship with the european union which makes critical contributions to peace, prosperity and security in europe and around the world. we believe that the united kingdom is stronger as a result of its european union's membership and we believe the european union is stronger as a result of having the united kingdom in the e.u. so that's -- our views on this are very clear. the internal process by which these matters are considered within the u.k. or any other country are obviously the province of those countries and those gover
is qualifying for e.u. bail-out money. 2013 is bringing more protests. young and old in athens. unemployment in greece is higher than spain. and pensions are slinking. >> we are rapidly going backwards. far backwards. the only battle is the battle on the street. >> greece is trying to keep a lid on things. mass transit strike in the second week. officials say they will jail workers if they don't go back on the job. greeks are tired. this is a hassle but what can we do? >> this is watched by the u.s. wall street buffeted by the european trouble. washington planning austerity moves and taxes and all are hoping what has happened in europe isn't a preview of years to come. bret? >> bret: greg palkot in london. thanks. >>> you have heard the talk is cheap. the promises are not. concerns entitlements and how to pay for them. jim angle says the president didn't shed light on that earlier in week. >> treated like innellis. he had several issues in inaugural address but one in particular stuck out to some. comment about entitlement. s. >> the commitment we make to each other, through medicare and soc
the sum total of all of your votes, refusing to sign a letter to the e.u. asking hezbollah to be designated a terrorist organization, being one of 22 to vote to guard terrorist terrorist organization, one of two to vote on sanction this body tried to make on iran and the statements you made after palestinians and about the jewish lobby, all of that together, that the image you created is one of sending the worst possible signal to enemies and friends at one of the most critical times in world history? >> i would not agree with that. if you had a chance tomorrow, today, after lunch, vote to say the iranian revolutionary guard was terrorist organization would you vote no? >> times change. it recognize that. yes, i would reconsider. >> thank you. that encouraging. >> bret: interesting exchange with lindsey graham. back with the panel. you talk about senator graham's exchange with chuck hagel. >> now that we have shown everyone how spontaneous and non-rehearsed we, are i was thinking of the tape where he quotes hagel saying the jewish lobby has intimidated senators in to voting
, the eu are still our enemy. you should sign the paper you never leave sudan, never travel out of sudan, and never [indiscernible] and i did not. >> he refused? >> i refused to sign it. >> we still on the hunger strike? >> yes. >> they put in a feeding tube for you? >> [indiscernible] after i arrived in the sudan hospital. >> the ticket onto an airplane at guantanamo? they put you on a plane on guantanamo? >> yes. me and to the people from sudan -- two people from sudan. >> did they put back on your head? >> people from afghanistan. they took us from guantanamo and landing in baghdad, iraq. then they changed the aircraft and set me to sudan. we had another guy from morocco to sudan. >> when you landed in khartoum, was your family there? >> my family at that time was in doha, but they came to me. when i came to sudan, because i sat too long, but did not understand where i was. i did not feel anything. i opened my eyes and i find myself in the hospital in sudan. after five or six years, my wife and my son. >> did you recognize your son? >> of course. of course. by feeling, not by his face
with them in ireland where i met with a distinct lack of enthusiasm from the e.u.'s group and the independent demigs on banking. sir john vickers, chairman of the independent commission, has criticized the u.k. coalition government for backing away from his original proposal while the recent report summarizing the responses received from the report acknowledges the widespread opposition to the proposal in a charmingly understated fashion, stating they welcome the group's analysis but argued that a compelling case of trading activities hasn't been made. they felt the proposal wasn't backed by the required evidence and there was a need for a thorough impact assessment. with all due respect to my friends in the european financial regulaer to community, when a regulatory proposal is viewed within the e.u. as being too harsh and the financial industry and harmful to marks, i think it's a clear sign it's time to take a step back and re-evaluate. regardless of what happens with respect to the vickers or like then proposal, even if all the most visitry olic allegations wall street
points to 26%. across the e.u., some 26 million people were out of work. wall street was down again today as the market marked time, waiting for corporate earnings announcements. the dow jones industrial average lost 55 points to close under 13,329. the nasdaq fell seven points to close below 3092. those are some of the day's major stories. now, back to gwen. >> ifill: we return to the u.s. consulate attack in benghazi, the only known suspect held in connection with the incident was released today in tunisia. his attorney said he was freed because of a lack of evidence. the attack, which killed u.s. ambassador to libya christopher stevens and three other americans was seen by large crowds and captured on security cameras, but the culprits have remained elusive. libyan witnesses have reportedly placed a local leader from the militant group ansar al-sharia, at the scene of the attacks. he survived a vigilante assassination attempt this week and remains at large. for more on the status of the investigation, i'm joined by nancy yousef of mcclatchy newspapers. welcome nancy. what do we know ab
, mary jane deeb, immediately implicate eu? >> well, because once you attack the infrastructure which produces oil, gas and which link africa to europe, then you can create havoc in the institution of oil. and so it is important. i mean the french understood the importance of the movement in mali. they understood that as professor vandewalle was saying that once you have a movement, once you take over power w it's not simply, you know, e ploding a car here or there t is actually take over power in mali, then similar movements would be allowed to do the same in the region. >> suarez: so you buy it that the algerians under muktar are acting under sympathy with those in mali. >> absolutely. i have no doubt that the radical islamists in nrt africa and those who are in neighboring countries including in nigeria are in sympathy. so and this is what the french want to stop. and the algerian government as well. because algeria itself is not that stable and could be further destabilized by the actions. >> suarez: professor, are these forces some kind of network or do they just simply want many
of your votes, refusing to sign a letter to the e.u. asking hezbollah to be designated a terrorist organization, being one of 22 to vote to designate the iranian revolutionary guard a terrorist organization, being one of two on two occasions to vote against sanctions that this body was trying to impose on iran, the statements you made about palestinians and about the jewish lobby, all that together. that the image you created is one of sending the worst possible signal to our enemies and friends at one of the most critical times in world history? >> no, i would not agree with that. because i have taken actions and made statements very clear as to what i believe hezbollah and hamas are as a terrorist organizations. >> if you had a chance tomorrow, today, after lunch, to vote to say that the iranian revolutionary guard was a terrorist organization. would you still vote no? >> the reason i voted no to start with... >> well i know why, you told me that. my question is would you reconsider and would you vote yes this time? or would you still vote no? >> times change. i recognize that an
123450eu6789. >> schieffer: you're favoring getting out of there. >> the quicker the better. >> schieffer: should we leave a residual force there of some kind. >> bob i would think i've been there twice now as a governor and as a u.s. senator and i believe we have some strategic especially the force base. that's a tremendous opportunity strategic point for us to launch from to protect our troops for our special forces to operate out of. i would did he ever to the experts -- defer to the experts and professionals on that. we have this war on terror not just from our generation but our children's and grandchildren's. we have to be able to strike at terror before it strikes us. >> schieffer: i don't think there's any question we have denied al-qaeda a save haven in afghanistan but they now have a safe haven in pakistan. what do we do with pakistani. >> i approve of the jones strikes there. i'm one that says we should use all the technology we have to protect america and americans without putting them in harm's way. that's been very effective. we've been able to strike and tak
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 74 (some duplicates have been removed)